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Archive for the ‘William Powell’ Category

After a brief interruption occasioned by the 70th anniversary of Casablanca, we return now to our series on William Powell and Myrna Loy’s films with 1936’s After the Thin Man.  This creatively-titled picture is the sequel to The Thin Man, the movie that launched both Powell and Loy’s careers into stardom in 1934. (more…)

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Next on the billing we have Double Wedding, another screwball in our duo’s long laundry list of comedies.  Loy once said of Powell, “He was so naturally witty and outrageous that I stayed somewhat detached, always a little incredulous.”  Nowhere is this more evident than in Double Wedding(more…)

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If you’re a character in 1934’s Evelyn Prentice, everything depends on what you’ve been doing.  The problem is that it’s 1934, so everything you’ve been doing–the misdeeds, anyway–is implied and not directly shown to the audience.  This may be good for your reputation, but when your misdeeds are crucial to the plot, it’s bad for the story.

That’s not to say that the story itself, or the overall film, is bad; indeed, Evelyn Prentice is one of my favorite non-Thin Man films that the pair made.  If you haven’t seen the original trailer, check it out here.  (Apologies for the bad quality; it hasn’t been restored.  Also, apologies for the trailer in general–it’s terribly misleading.)  The basic premise is that John and Evelyn Prentice (Powell and Loy) are married, but their marriage is a troubled one.  John is a lawyer who spends more time at the office than he does at home, and Evelyn feels neglected.  (This leads to what is possibly one of the most controversial lines I’ve ever heard in a film from this era: Evelyn’s friend Amy Blake (Una Merkel) asks, “Does your husband beat you?”  and Evelyn responds, “No, I wish he would.  He’d have to come home to do it.”)  When he is at home, he usually brings his work home with him–either meeting people about cases at the apartment or at least discussing the cases–which leads Evelyn to ask, “Do you realize that all we have for breakfast, lunch, and dinner are thieves, embezzlers, and murderers?”  She’s tired of it, and this is the situation upon which the film opens.

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Well folks, I’ve decided that I’m going to do a series on William Powell and Myrna Loy.  I started with their film The Thin Man, and altogether the two made thirteen or fourteen pictures together–depending on whether or not you count Loy’s cameo at the end of Powell’s film The Senator Was Indiscreet–so it makes sense to go ahead and discuss all of their pictures while I’m at it.  (Also, I enjoy watching them together, and this is my blog, so this is what I’m going to do.) (more…)

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I don’t remember exactly how old I was the first time I saw it–around thirteen or fourteen.  I don’t remember the time of day, though I vaguely recollect that it was dark outside so it must have been either very early or very late.  I do remember where I was and what I was doing: I was sitting in the big plushy armchair in the den at home, and I was channel-surfing.  As is the case with so many discoveries, I wasn’t looking for anything in particular, and that was when I first saw it.  I don’t remember the first scene I saw, but I do remember being intrigued and then enthralled.  I had stumbled upon the 1934 film The Thin Man, starring William Powell and Myrna Loy, and my life was changed forever.

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